This blog is about the Byzantine culture and civilization which centred at the city of Constantinople, spread across Europe, Asia and Africa and greatly influenced people’s lives and deeds. Around the Mediterranean, from the steps of Kiev and the Russian mainland down to the Nile and its Copts; and from the domes and mosques of the Muslim East it spread all the way up to France and the courts of the German emperors. Though politically Byzantium ceased to exist in 1453 when the capital itself fell to the emerging power of the Ottoman Turks, its culture had such deep roots that it continued to influence not only the Ottoman Empire, but all the states which saw themselves as successors to a culture so familiar and so deeply missed.

 

rumelia:

Byzantine (and older) art and architecture in Istanbul, Turkey, unknown date (possibly during WWI).

there are lots of more very nice pics in the source link.

jeannepompadour:

Empress Zoe asks the eunuch Sgouritzes to poison John the Orphanotrophos from the so-called Madrid Skylitzes, 12th century 

jeannepompadour:

Empress Zoe asks the eunuch Sgouritzes to poison John the Orphanotrophos from the so-called Madrid Skylitzes, 12th century 

instagram:

A Trip to Istanbul’s Hagia Sophia (Ayasofya)

Originally a church, then a mosque and now a museum, the Hagia Sophia is Istanbul’s most famous monument and one of the most important religious structures on the planet.

For a millennium after its construction in the sixth century, the Hagia Sophia was the world’s largest cathedral. Its famed dome rests on an arcade of 40 arched windows and remains one of the largest in the world, standing 55 meters (182 feet) from floor level at its maximum. From Byzantine mosaics to calligraphic roundels and even scaffolding from ongoing restoration, layers of the building’s history can be viewed all at once. To get a first-person look inside the Hagia Sophia, be sure to visit the Ayasofya (Hagia Sophia) location page.

adokal:

The byzantine church of the Monastery of Panagia Kosmosoteira (Mother of God the saviour of the world), 11th c. CE. Ferres- Thrace, Greece.
source

adokal:

The byzantine church of the Monastery of Panagia Kosmosoteira (Mother of God the saviour of the world), 11th c. CE. Ferres- Thrace, Greece.

source

The 11th century byzantine castle of saint Niceta (san’ Aniceto in italian) in Calabria, South Italy. Calabria was for centuries a stronghold of byzantine culture and greek language. To this day griko, the south italian greek dielect is still spoken in calabria and puglia regions.

St.George in byzantine military uniform. 11th cent. Steatite Icon. Vatopedi monastery, Athos, Greece

St.George in byzantine military uniform. 11th cent. Steatite Icon. Vatopedi monastery, Athos, Greece

Detail of the Euphrasian Basilica in Porec, Croatia. One of the Paleo Christian byzantine architectural examples in Mediterranean.

Detail of the Euphrasian Basilica in Porec, Croatia. One of the Paleo Christian byzantine architectural examples in Mediterranean.

artofthedarkages:

“The Holy City Mosaic at Umm ar-Rasas”
A mosaic containing important Byzantine cities around the border, including Jerusalem which is labelled as ‘Hagiapolis’, or the Holy City. The architecture in the cityscape is abstracted and put on a titled aerial/vertical perspective. Labelled in Greek.
Pieced together with stone tesserae.
Made in 785 as a floor mosaic in the Church of St. Stephen at Umm ar-Rasas in Jordan, where it is still located.



mosaic detail depicting Jerousalem; H Agia Polis=Η Αγία Πόλις ( the Holy City).

artofthedarkages:

The Holy City Mosaic at Umm ar-Rasas

A mosaic containing important Byzantine cities around the border, including Jerusalem which is labelled as ‘Hagiapolis’, or the Holy City. The architecture in the cityscape is abstracted and put on a titled aerial/vertical perspective. Labelled in Greek.

Pieced together with stone tesserae.

Made in 785 as a floor mosaic in the Church of St. Stephen at Umm ar-Rasas in Jordan, where it is still located.

mosaic detail depicting Jerousalem; H Agia Polis=Η Αγία Πόλις ( the Holy City).

fyeah-history:

A selection of illustrations and text from the Madrid Skylitzes
The Madrid Skylitzes is a richly illustrated illuminated manuscript of the Synopsis of Histories (Σύνοψις Ἱστοριῶν), by John Skylitzes, which covers the reigns of the Byzantine emperors from the death of Nicephorus I in 811 to the deposition of Michael IV in 1057. The manuscript was produced in Sicily in the 12th century, and is now at the Biblioteca Nacional de España in Madrid, with the shelfmark MS Graecus Vitr. 26-2; it widely known as the Madrid Skylitzes, Codex Græcus Matritensis Ioannis Skyllitzes, or Skyllitzes Matritensis. It is the only surviving illustrated manuscript of a Greek chronicle, and includes 574 miniatures. It is unclear whether these illustrations are copies of earlier Byzantine images or were newly created specifically for this copy.

Yaroslavl or Rostov (?), late 13th centuryTempera on lime wood. glykofilousa type russian icon.

Yaroslavl or Rostov (?), late 13th century
Tempera on lime wood. glykofilousa type russian icon.

11th century bloodstone cameo with Saint George from Constantinople.

11th century bloodstone cameo with Saint George from Constantinople.